How to Know How Much Cooling an Industrial Control Panel Needs

 

How_to_Know_How_Much_Cooling_an_Industrial_Control_Panel_Needs.jpgIt is generally accepted that industrial control panels need some form of enclosure cooling to ensure that internal temperatures do not exceed equipment-safe working limits. In most instances, the heat load is such that the panel needs to be, at the very least, fitted with cooling fans. However, due to a desire to prevent equipment becoming contaminated by dirt and dust, closed loop solutions are often specified. Here’s how to assess the right cooling solution.

Continue reading

5 Keys to Protecting an Industrial Control Panel Enclosure

 

5 Keys to Protecting an Industrial Control Panel Enclosure

When assessing what kind of protection is needed for an industrial control panel enclosure, there are five key factors to consider. These are ambient temperature, humidity, pollution, weather and dust. Once the effects of these factors are adequately assessed, it’s a relatively simple task to evaluate the type of enclosure that’s required and decide how to manage the internal temperature. Here’s how these five key aspects affect enclosure cooling.

Continue reading

6 Environmental Considerations for Industrial Control Panels

 

6 Environmental Considerations for Industrial Control Panels

When selecting an industrial control panel, it’s essential to give careful consideration to the environment where the panel will be installed. The ambient temperature, humidity, risk of exposure to water, snow or ice, and the presence of chemicals all have an impact the on specification of the enclosure and how it is cooled.

Before finalizing the specification for the enclosure, it’s crucial that these environmental variables are assessed and their impact evaluated. Although there are a number of aspects to consider, they can be conveniently grouped into six categories. Continue reading

What You Need to Know About Cooling Control Panel Enclosures

 

What_You_Need_to_Know_About_Cooling_Control_Panel_Enclosures.jpgControl panels are designed to house and protect electrical components for powering and controlling industrial, HVAC, and other equipment. Industrial control panels may include PLCs, VFDs, contactors, fuses, switches, transformers, timers, and other components, each of which operates within an optimal temperature range. Continue reading

How to Cool Control Panel Enclosures in Small Spaces

 

How_to_Cool_Control_Panel_Enclosures_in_Small_Spaces.jpgThere’s no getting around it. Critical electrical equipment housed in industrial control panels requires operating temperatures low enough to maintain efficiency and reliability. Without a properly sized cooling system, components such as VFDs, motor starters and PLCs are susceptible to reduced capacity, malfunctions or even premature failure, which can result in expensive downtime as well as unplanned repair and replacement costs.

Continue reading

How Temperature Control Affects Control Panel Design

 

How_Temperature_Control_Affects_Control_Panel_Design.jpg

Control panel designers face an ongoing conflict between meeting the technical requirements for electrical control panels and budget allocations. On the one hand, there’s the desire to choose generously sized control panels that optimize the layout of electrical equipment and, on the other, the need to exercise tight cost restraints that inevitably mean compromises are made. There’s also the need to consider the space that’s available in the plant as well as the environmental conditions that are present.

One of the biggest challenges is to manage the enclosure temperature and ensure the heat distribution inside the control panel is such that equipment temperatures are kept within specification.

Continue reading

Why Cooling is Critical for Your Industrial Control Panel Enclosure

Why_Cooling_is_Critical_for_Your_Industrial_Control_Panel_Enclosure.jpgIndustrial control panel designers often overlook the importance of effective enclosure cooling. For this reason, many panels are designed for natural ventilation and insufficient consideration is given to the combined effects of ambient temperature and enclosure heat load. This results in an inability to maintain the cabinet’s internal temperature at a safe level.

Continue reading